UK tourists get chance to see live show Kynren, tickets go on sale

Tourists and holidaymakers looking to explore England and its history next summer may treat themselves with the theatrical extravaganza – the open-air historical theatre event ‘Kynren – an epic tale of England’ – set to take place in Bishop Auckland, County Durham, starting July 2016.

According to a report by The Guardian, tickets are now on sale for the live action night show which will open on July 2, 2016. Tickets, which cost £25-£55 for adults and £19-£41 for children, are available for booking at kynren.co.uk. There will be 14 performances next summer.

Produced in collaboration with the team behind the live historical extravaganzas at French theme park Puy du Fou, the GBP31m show will be delivered by a cast of more than 1,000 members of the local community. It will be performed along a bend of the river Wear with Auckland Castle as its backdrop, on a stage measuring over 7.5 acres.

Kynren – which signifies the Anglo-Saxon word for generation – will take up to 8,000 spectators on a journey through 2,000 years of British history, from the Roman and Viking invasions through to the Industrial Revolution and the Second World War. More than half of Kynren’s cast is women – many of whom have been trained in stage sword fighting and archery. The lives of Queens Elizabeth I and Victoria will also be represented.

Kynren, which will be as much educational as it aims to be entertaining, is expected to attract thousands of locals and tourists. The Puy du Fou theme park, on which the show is based, opened in 1978 in the Vendee region of western France. Since then, its open-air theatrical performances have been seen by over 10 million people and the park welcomes two million visitors annually.

Voices from Titanic arrive at a Singapore Museum

A Century after RMS Titanic sank in the North Atlantic, just two hours and 40 minutes after striking an iceberg, and with a loss of more than two thirds of the passengers and crew. The story has lost none of its power to shock.  The arrival of the long-running artifacts exhibition in Singapore brings the raw emotion of Titanic’s infamous maiden voyage, aided by an audio narrative from imagineear.

The exhibition narrative tells the human stories behind the tragedy of the Titanic – the world’s largest, ‘practically unsinkable’ passenger vessel– illustrated by over 250 artifacts recovered from almost four kilometers beneath the freezing North Atlantic.  With over 25 million tickets sold worldwide to date, fascination with the Titanic shows no sign of waning.  But imagineear’s Chief Executive, Andrew Nugée, felt that a whole new approach to the narrative was necessary:  “This is a story, the cold facts of which are well known, and indeed have passed into legend.  We felt that a new audience in Singapore deserved a fresh approach to the human stories, to provide the small domestic detail of the multiple personal tragedies, as well as the broader importance of the largest such peacetime disaster of the day.”

Nine galleries will lead visitors through the ship’s conception, construction and launch, as well as following her passengers and crew through the sailing, life on board, the iceberg and the sinking a century ago.  The exhibition also tells the fascinating and evolving story of the discovery of the wreck, and the recovery and preservation of its artefacts.

Tom Zaller, Museum Director, ArtScience Museum at Marina Bay Sands, said “Titanic is such an iconic ship with such a powerful story to tell that we’re proud to present Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition at such an equally iconic venue.  For the first time in Singapore and Southeast Asia, visitors will travel back in time to relive Titanic’s majestic maiden voyage and experience the drama that unfolded as the world’s largest ship sank to the depths of the Atlantic Ocean.”

To understand the impact of Titanic in Singapore, a new gallery named “Singapore 1912” will be dedicated to local connections.  Visitors will learn how the Titanic tragedy strongly resonated in Singapore.  Images of Singapore in the early 1900s will be displayed alongside local newspaper articles that covered the disaster at the time, alongside archaeological finds from the period.

“ArtScience Museum at Marina Bay Sands is committed to bringing blockbuster exhibitions to Singapore that are accessible to people of all ages and interests”, added Mr Zaller.  “With Titanic: The Artefact Exhibition, we’ve taken this one step further and enhanced its relevance to Singaporeans by demonstrating the impact of global developments here, even in the early 20th Century.”


Los Angeles’ Historic Hotels Continue to Attract Star-Crazy Visitors

California’s largest city is a slight enigma, housing an iconic film industry yet lacking a independent  identity, particularly in its central suburbs. While Los Angeles remains one of the nation’s top tourist draws, its lack of cult attractions is one of several factors holding it back from becoming a must-see international city. That is, of course, a lack of cult attractions within the city itself.

Walk through Los Angeles’ suburban areas and you’ll constantly be confronted with reminders of its history – large ‘gold rush’ styled villas and equally expansive boulevards. The city comprises part of the nation’s largest economy and looks particularly affluent when viewed from street level, with the iconic ‘California-style’ housing spreading for miles into the desert surroundings and nearby hills.

But venture outside of suburban Los Angeles and you’ll find a series of historic hotels, each home to thousands of creepy stories and classic riches-to-rags disaster tales. Los Angeles’ recent history isn’t lacking in controversy and tragedy – during the height of the city’s drug-fuelled boom, rock star and iconic figure David Bowie suggested that it should be ‘burned from the face of the earth.’

While the city’s various historic hotels draw in guests, it’s the Sunset Tower Hotel that draws most of the celebrity interest. Built in the late 1920s and used as a housing complex by John Wayne, this big and blocky building is one of several lined with photographs of its former guests. It’s not a complete image of vintage Hollywood, however, as modern amenities make it a more attractive residence.

If the thought of a bland night in the Marriott, Intercontinental, or Four Seasons lacks the creativity that Los Angeles is known for, don’t let it become your only choice. A weekend in one of the city’s numerous historical hotels is equal parts interesting and luxurious, and a welcome alternative to its central city character-devoid complexes.