Pilots wanted! easyJet launches new recruitment drive for 1,000 pilots

A parent, a former gymnast and DJ are the stars of a new easyJet recruitment campaign, encouraging people from all walks of life to train to become an airline pilot.

easyjet announced on January 31 that for the first time since the beginning of the pandemic, it is re-opening its pilot training programme. To support future growth opportunities, the airline is recruiting over 1,000 new pilots over the next five years.

The new ad campaign, featuring multi-talented, real-life easyJet pilots, aims to highlight that everyone has the potential to turn their skills and passions towards becoming an airline pilot.

Mother of two, captain Iris de Kan, is seen in one of the ads with 5-year-old daughter Kiki. The ad serves to communicate that those with incredible multi-tasking skills could make for excellent pilots. While many parents wish they had eyes in the back of their head, it’s a common misconception that 2020 vision is required to become an airline pilot.

Former gymnast and now senior first officer with easyJet, Nina Le is featured performing a split leap on the tarmac, showcasing her fantastic reactions and hand-eye coordination – key skills for aspiring pilots.

easyJet senior first officer Aaron Moseley, a former resident DJ, transitioned from the club decks to the flight deck by training to become a pilot for easyJet seven years ago. The company says that his hands-on practical skills have enabled him to switch records for runways.

The new recruitment ad campaign is part of easyJet’s efforts to find the next generation of easyJet pilots, with a continued focus on encouraging more women to become an airline pilot to address the gender imbalance in the industry.

Johan Lundgren, easyJet CEO, said, ‘We are delighted to be reopening our pilot training programme again for the first time since the pandemic hit and will see us recruit over 1,000 new pilots in the coming years. easyJet has long championed greater diversity in the flight deck and this series of ads aims to highlight the extraordinary breadth of skills our pilots have and show that pilots can be found in all walks of life, in a bid to attract more diverse candidates. We continue to focus on challenging gendered stereotypes of the career having doubled the number of female pilots flying with us in recent years. We also acknowledge that whilst we have made progress, there is still work to do. Increasing diversity in all of its forms in the flight deck is a long-term focus for easyJet and so we will continue to ensure we lead the industry on this issue.’

To apply to the Generation easyJet Pilot Training Programme, aspiring pilots will need to be aged 18 or over by the time they begin training and have a minimum of 5 General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) of Grade C or above (or equivalent), including Mathematics, Science and English language – no higher qualifications or degrees are required. The company says that its Generation easyJet Pilot Training Programme takes aspiring pilots from little to no flying experience, to operating a commercial passenger jet in around two years with its intensive, industry-leading training course.

The campaign launches from today across easyJet’s social media channels across the UK and Europe.

Aspiring pilots can find out more and apply today via becomeapilot.easyJet.com

Air tax damaging to the UK economy

Removing Air Passenger Duty would result in an additional 91,000 British jobs being created and £4.2 billion added to the economy in 12 months, it has been revealed.

The research, by World Travel&Tourism Council (WTTC), shows that comes as Britain is about to face yet another rise in Air Passenger Duty. Increases planned from April mean a family of four flying to Malaga will pay £52 extra on the price of their tickets. This rises to £260 for the same family to fly to Florida and £368 to fly to Australia.

David Scowsill, WTTC President&CEO, said: “Air Passenger Duty is a completely disproportionate tax on people’s holidays and is hitting business travel hard. When the economy needs help, it is economically illogical to continue with a tax that costs the country some 91,000 jobs and as much as £4.2 billion.”

In the next 12 months, the UK government will collect £2.8 billion in extra tax from air travelers, far more than any other country in the world.

David continued: “Travel and tourism grew by 4.1 percent in the UK last year, but is forecast to slow to 1.3 percent in 2012. This slowdown is partly due to the impact of Air Passenger Duty, which is dampening demand.

“This tax is damaging the economy at a crucial time and is having a negative effect on trade with countries in the Caribbean, Africa, and Asia. We urge the UK government to recognize the impact on the overall economy and reduce Air Passenger Duty.”

Martin Craigs, CEO of the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA), said: “The UK is an island trading nation; air services are the vital lifeblood of modern global commerce. The UK Air Passenger Duty is now the world’s highest by a wide margin. It is certainly turning away tourism and trade from the world’s fastest-growing economic region, Asia Pacific.

“Airport Passenger Duty started in1994 at £5 and some worthy intentions to offset aviations carbon footprint. Today at £85 to zone D (Asia/Pacific) it’s a ‘detention tax’ that’s restricting job growth, alienating important trade partners and not being transparently directed to green projects. Airport Passenger Duty maybe easy to collect but it’s also easy to see its macroeconomic damage.”


Travel and tourism to boost UK economy in 2012

The UK will be increasingly reliant on travel and tourism in 2012 as jobs and economic growth in the sector outstrip the wider economy.

According to a report released today by the World Travel&Tourism Council (WTTC), the industry will grow by 1.3 percent in 2012 – over double the rate of growth in the wider economy, predicted to be 0.6 percent by the International Monetary Fund.

This rate of growth means that the travel and tourism industry is expected to directly contribute £35.6 billion and almost 950,000 jobs to the British economy.

When the wider economic impacts of the industry are taken into account, travel and tourism is forecast to contribute over £100 billion to the UK economy and generate 2.3 million jobs – or 1 in 13 of all jobs in the UK.

During 2012, some 30 million people will visit the UK, as the country maintains its position as one of the top 10 most-visited nations.

In 2011, the industry grew by 4.1 percent in the UK – or 5 times the rate of the economy as a whole; according to the Office of National Statistics, the UK economy grew by 0.7 percent in 2011.

David Scowsill, President and CEO of WTTC, said: “At a time of significant economic hardship, the travel and tourism industry is helping to beat the recession by generating jobs and growth at a faster rate than the wider UK economy. 2012 is likely to be bolstered by the cheap pound, the continued trend for domestic holidays, and the extra Bank Holiday weekend for the Golden Jubilee. The London Olympics are unlikely to have any significant effect.”

Figures for the UK for 2012 show a marked difference to the European Union as a whole. A tightening of consumer spending, uncertainty around the future of the Eurozone, and peripheral economies of Greece, Spain, Italy, and Portugal, and the impact of austerity measures kicking-in will result in a contraction of the industry of 0.3 percent.

The WTTC’s annual Economic Impact Report also shows that the global travel and tourism industry is set for a milestone year as the industry’s direct contribution to the global economy is expected to pass $2 trillion in GDP and 100 million jobs.

The report forecasts that the global travel and tourism industry will grow by 2.8 percent in 2012, marginally faster than the global rate of economic growth, predicted to be 2.5 percent.

This rate of growth means that the travel and tourism industry is expected to directly contribute $2 trillion to the global economy and sustain some 100.3 million jobs.

When the wider economic impacts of the industry are taken into account, travel and tourism is forecast to contribute some $6.5 trillion to the global economy and generate 260 million jobs – or 1 in 12 of all jobs on the planet.