Olympic Games unlikely to boost UK tourism

In 2012 we will welcome two of the biggest UK events in decades, however the country is unlikely to see a boost in the number of tourists visiting the UK next year.

 

In June celebrations will commence for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, and the Olympic Games will take place in July and August, however according to VisitBritain neither of these big events will product a significant boom in tourism from overseas.

 

The UK tourist authority has predicted that 30.7million travellers will head to Britain next year – around the same amount of tourists recorded from the past 12 months.

 

Authorities have blamed the Olympics for the expected tourism figures, stating that would-be tourists see the event as much a turn-off as others see it as a reason to travel.

 

Christopher Rodrigues, chairman of VisitBritain said: “History tells you (the Olympic Games) have displacement effect in the year of the event. Lots of people say: ‘I’ll give it a miss’”.

 

The challenge for us is to counter the displacement effect with an active marketing programme to encourage people to consider Britain in 2012”.

 

A £100million marketing fund to boost tourism has been announced by the Government, even though the economic benefit of next year’s 30.7million tourists is expected to be only £17.6million.

 

Sandie Dawe, chief executive of VisitBritain said: “While these (visitor) figures are in line with expected numbers in 2011, maintaining current visitor levels would be a good outcome in a year that is proving difficult to predict due to the current global economic climate and the impact this may have in many of our key markets”.

 

She added: “Visit Britain is working hard to ensure that the Games and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations will generate positive PR for Britain, taking advantage of the global interest and creating a lasting tourism legacy for the future”.

 

Article by Charlotte Greenhalgh

‘Fake’ London Dungeon found to be real

A London Dungeon exhibit has been given added creepy credibility after an artificial human skeleton has revealed to be real.

 

The skeleton which has been at the attraction since 1975, is now believed to date back much further.

 

Bill Edwards, curator at Guy’s Hospital medical museum believes the remains – which consist of a rib cage and backbone – were wired together in the 1950s.

 

On Friday he will return to the South London attraction to see if a second skeleton, which hangs in a cage in the museum, is also real.

 

According to the BBC, he said: “I need to go back and examine that one more closely when the Dungeon team can get it down from the wall”.

 

“But from what I could see, it looks either human, or a combination of some human and some artificial parts”.

 

Since the revelation of the first human skeleton, the London Dungeon must decide whether they are willing to obtain a £2,000 a year licence from the Human Tissues Authority.

 

Mark Oakley, Spokesman for the London Dungeon said: “We had suspicions that these skeletons might be real, but it still came as a bit of a shock to have it confirmed”.

 

“We have yet to decide what to do. We’ve even talked about giving them a dignified burial. We’re still mulling that. We’ll probably go and look at some artificial skeletons and see how good they are”.

 

Catherine Pritchard, operations manager for the museum said there were suspicions surrounding the skeleton, dating back to when the bodies were ‘smuggled’ in from the Far East to be used by early anatomists for dissection.

 

In the coming weeks the remains were ready to be moved to the dungeon’s yearly ‘Satan’s Grotto’, however other props will now be used.

 

Mr Oakley said: “The London Dungeon is full of secrets and we’re forever turning up surprises”. He added that the museum recently found that the Dungeon was close to a World Ward Two bomb shelter, which was the scene of ‘quite a horrific tragedy’.

 

The London Dungeon is home to ‘1000 years of London’s darkest and most gory history’.

 

Article by Charlotte Greenhalgh

London could suffer 95 per cent tourism slump during Olympic’s

In a survey conducted among its members, the European Tour Operators Association (ETOA) has discovered that a major slump in leisure tourism bookings is underway.

At the end of October 2011, ETOA canvassed 38 operators who move more than two million people annually to London. They revealed that they were expecting a significant downturn throughout 2012.

This looks like it will be extremely severe in July and August, where operators are currently seeing a 60percent shortfall in bookings, becoming acute during the period of the Olympic Games where bookings are running at 95 percent below where they would normally be. Bookings for the rest of the year are running at 20percent below this time last year.

“This is still very early in the booking cycle,” said Tom Jenkins, Executive Director of ETOA, “And only reflects what our normal leisure customers are doing. We always see a decline in demand for a destination during an Olympic year.

Clients tend to think that a city has priorities other than being a place to visit for a normal holiday, so some of this was to be expected. But this tendency is becoming absolute as the hotel rates climb in July and August. During the Olympic period itself, there is currently almost no demand from regular tourists. For foreign visitors there is near total displacement by the Games.”

“One of the main reasons for the drop is that the hotels believe that they are going to be full. London appears to have priced itself out of the market in July and August,” said John Boulding, President of Insight Vacations, a leading luxury tour operator, ”Insight has won a Queens Award for Export, but we have had no choice but to remove London from our best-selling European ‘Panorama’ tours in July and August. Each one will start and finish on the Continent. They are selling well, but they are selling without the UK.”

These figures represent only current trends in leisure tourism. These may change. They do not account for what corporate business may come, or for those people who are coming for the Olympics. But bookings for London will have to strengthen enormously to make up for this shortfall: London has 125,000 hotel rooms to fill. Foreign Olympic visitors averaged no more than 25,000 people per night in Athens. And July and August are normally the two busiest months for inbound tourists: they usually represent 22% of foreign visitor arrivals.

London is a gateway for the rest of the UK. If the UK as a whole suffers an equivalent decline, then £3.5billion of business will be lost to the British economy as a whole during July and August alone.

The problem for the tourism industry is that, even if London does fill with Olympic enthusiasts, they do not behave as normal tourists. Their presence is determined by their interest in an atypical event. They do not come to shop, to sightsee, or to attend the theatre.

“We anticipate a significant decline in business in July and August 2012 for London theatres and attractions,” said John Wales, Managing Director of Encore Tickets, one of London’s leading theatre ticket agencies, who sell over 2 million tickets annually, “At present I anticipate sales from tourists to be at least 40percent down on last year, so we are looking urgently at alternative customers to the traditional inbound visitor that has been displaced.”

“We know that there will be a large drop in demand next summer,” said Nick Palan, owner of Golden Tours, a major sightseeing operator in London,
“and this is having a major impact on our capital investment plans. Furthermore, such is the projected disruption on the roads; there is a major concern whether any tours in London can be operated at all during the Olympic period.”

This does not bode well for the legacy of the Games. Scaring away customers, on the assumption that they will gratefully return is an unconventional sales tactic. “The long-term trend implications are huge,” said John Boulding, “The UK has traditionally been part of a visit to ‘Europe’ for long-haul visitors. But they can then save time, avoid high visa costs, and benefit from Schiphol’s or Charles de Gaulle’s freedom from APD if they avoid the UK. The Olympics is now making them do so. The legacy of this example is not a happy picture for the UK.”

Commuters urged to travel differently during London 2012

Transport Minister Norman Baker today urged commuters and businesses in London to think differently about how they travel during the Olympic Games as he marked a year to go to what is likely to be one of the busiest days on the transport network.

Modelling by Games organisers predict that 3 August 2012 will see an extra three million trips made on top of the 12 million trips on public transport being made on an average London workday. This is due to it being the first day for track and field, and with events at larger capacity venues such as the Olympic Stadium, Horse Guards Parade and the Aquatics Centre the number of spectators are likely to peak.

In order to manage the increased number of people using the Capital’s transport network, the Government wants commuters and Londoners to travel and work differently during the Games. For example commuters who live near work, or travel short distances within central London, are being urged to cycle or walk to work. Those who live further away are being encouraged to try different routes; stagger their journey times to avoid the busiest periods; work remotely; or use video conferencing for meetings.

Norman Baker was speaking at BT where he was shown innovative new ways for businesses and individuals to work remotely from both home and the office. He said:

“The Games will be a once-in-a-generation test for both our transport system and our adaptability. As we edge ever closer to the Olympics, hand-in-hand with new investment must go new solutions.

“I am the first ever transport minister to have official responsibility for alternatives to travel and the Olympics will be a key time to really embrace these ideas. It’s time to oil the creaking bike, dig out the walking boots, work out how to use the video conferencing equipment, and fire up the laptop gathering dust at the back of the cupboard.

“And of course Government has to play its part – at DfT we’ll be cutting our travel footprint by half during the Games, with similar initiatives across Whitehall. But all businesses need to play their part too – there’s plenty of help and advice out there so no excuse why we can’t reduce the amount we travel during the 17 days of the Games.”

In the run up to the Olympics around £6.5bn has been invested in upgrading and extending transport links including the first ever domestic high speed train in Britain, new stations, more tube trains and line extensions. And, as well as the big ticket items, investment has been put into everyday improvements such as innovative customer travel information systems and more user-friendly walking, cycling and river routes.

Windsor Castle’s famous round tower is reopened

Yesterday the world famous round tower at Windsor Castle re-opened it’s doors to the public for the first time in almost 40 years.

Closed in 1975 for construction work including under-pinning to stop subsidence, the tower was then converted into offices for the Royal Archives, and hasn’t open to the public until now.

The 800-year-old landmark in Berkshire will no doubt be a top tourist attraction over the summer months.

The re-opening will also be marked with a new tour ‘Conquer the Tower’. This will include walking up the 200 step to take in views over London and Windsor from 65.5 meters up.

The round tower was build by Henry II in 1170. William the Conqueror then replaced the heath stone with wooden Norman keep.

At the heart of the property sits an artificial mound, called a motte, formed by chalk spoil from the surrounding ditch.

Today the tower looks as it did when George IV remodelled it in the 1820’s. In line with his romantic notion of castle architecture, the tower was heightened by nine metres and given gothic-style battlements.

The 45-minute Conquer the Tower tours will run daily until September 30.

Demand for accommodation soars as Londoners rent their way to gold during Olympics

Figures released today by HomeAway.co.uk, UK arm of the market leader of the online holiday rentals industry, reveal that London homeowners are benefiting from an unprecedented demand for holiday rentals during the London Games. Demand for rental properties in London for the Olympic summer of 2012 has increased by 131 times as compared to the previous year.

It is expected that home owners looking to cash in on the leap of interest could generate an average of £4,500 by renting their home during the 16 day-long event; an average of £2,000 per week. Londoners thinking about doing this can now find out how much a property similar to theirs could make using HomeAway.co.uk’s newly launched interactive Olympic Rental Map. The Map calculates the average income you could expect to make from your home; taking into account the rental rate increase the Olympics is expected to spark as well as proximity to sporting venues and transport hubs.

The Olympics has the potential to earn millions in rental income for homeowners in the Capital. There are currently over 700 London properties available for rent on www.HomeAway.co.uk and the company is expecting weekly rental rates for those properties to increase by almost 150% on average, echoing a trend for price spikes seen during the 2010 World Cup in Johannesburg.

Tim Boughton, UK General Manager, HomeAway.co.uk said: “We have observed a steady increase in tourists looking for holiday rentals, with particularly high peaks in demand around major global sporting events. These latest figures confirm that London will be no exception. Enquiries for London properties have skyrocketed, particularly those properties in close proximity to the key Olympics sites and with good transport links to London’s top attractions. This, combined with the expected repetition of the 150% increase in rental prices seen at the 2010 World Cup, means savvy Londoners will truly be going for gold next summer.”

Corinthia Hotel opens its doors in London

Corinthia Hotel London today announced its doors are open to the public. Corinthia’s new flagship is a landmark property and joins the ranks of London’s finest 5-star luxury hotels. Combining traditional grandeur with modern freshness, the luxuriously redesigned Victorian destination is ideally located in the heart of London, a short walk from many of the city’s major attractions.

“The project marks the culmination of an exciting journey,” said General Manager Matthew Dixon, “Corinthia Hotel London is an intricately restored grand hotel with a 21st century approach. Its modern elegance is defined by a blend of classic Victorian architecture with outstanding craftsmanship and contemporary art, mirroring the energy, style, and history of the area. Guests are offered all the modern luxuries whilst enjoying an authentic experience in a hotel and location with heritage.”

Corinthia London has already established its name among a number of international celebrities and London influencers. Some of the biggest names in cinema, art, culture, media, fashion, and luxury have visited for a first look, and recent preview events have included parties in conjunction with the BAFTAs, Vanity Fair, GQ, and Condé Nast Traveller.

The newly-reconstructed flagship hotel features two world-class restaurants. Garry Hollihead, winner of Michelin stars at three different establishments, is at the helm of The Northall. The restaurant celebrates the best of British artisanal produce, including Cumbrian short horn cattle, together with an extensive selection of organic and biodynamic wines by the glass and by the bottle. The hotel’s Mediterranean speciality seafood restaurant, Massimo Restaurant and Oyster Bar, is headed by the renowned Italian chef patron Massimo Riccioli.

Bassoon, the musically-inspired bar designed by the award-winning David Collins Studio, serves both molecular cocktails and colonial-inspired drinks from its boutique spirits library. Elegantly discreet, it is expected to be a popular destination for Londoners, as well as international guests.

The heartbeat of the hotel is its Lobby Lounge. The space offers a residential feel enhanced by an eclectic mix of furniture and bespoke artworks. The soaring dome in the center is adorned with the pioneering Full Moon chandelier created by Parisian designer Chafik Gasmi and produced by Baccarat, the prestigious French crystal manufacturer. The Full Moon, composed of 1,001 crystal baubles, is the grand focal point of the main hotel area. Lobby Lounge guests can take afternoon tea and indulge in innovative creations by celebrated Pastry Chef Claire Clark or enjoy an evening cocktail.

Corinthia Hotel London commissioned twin brothers, Ian and Richard Abell, founders of Based Upon, to create a unique artwork piece for the hotel’s reception and custom-built doors for the lobby elevators. The nine-square-meter bronze artwork in the reception area features the River Thames meandering through the city of London with a true replica of each building on its banks, with Corinthia at its center. Casts of leaves from Northumberland Avenue and St. James’s Park were taken to create the textural marks for the lift doors, adding a delicate touch.

Award-winning international spa company, ESPA, has partnered with the hotel to launch its flagship ESPA Life at Corinthia. Spanning 35,520 square feet and on four floors, this magnificent spa features 17 treatment rooms, a private spa suite, nail studio, indoor pool, vitality pool, amphitheatre sauna, ice fountain, marble heated lounges, private sleep pods, a state-of-the-art gym, and Daniel Galvin hair salon. ESPA has enlisted exceptional therapists, naturopaths, acupuncturists, osteopaths, and physiotherapists offering guests a new level of spa and wellness in a five-star luxury setting.

Located on the mezzanine floor are 6 private executive level meeting rooms, conveniently linked through to the mezzanine dining area of The Northall for a private lunch or dinner. Five of the meeting rooms are fitted with a state-of-the-art, high-definition, optical, turnkey system that effortlessly allows total connectivity for media broadcasting, recording, editing, and mixing.

The hotel features 294 guest rooms, including 43 suites. The sumptuously-appointed rooms, averaging 485 square feet, are among the largest in their category in London’s luxury hotel market. With no restrictions on check-in and check-out times, Corinthia Hotel London has dedicated itself to providing guests ultimate flexibility, convenience and comfort during their stay.

London’s Midsummer Supercars: How the Middle East’s Richest Relax

Residents of Central London have noticed an unusual trend hitting the streets each summer. It’s not a more relaxed approach to clothing or a heat wave, but the incredible amount of supercars hitting inner city streets. The cars have become a fairly standard sight around the city, with a collection of ultra-expensive supercars appearing every summer, and disappearing just as fast as the weather.

The cars in question are owned by a group of mega-rich Middle Eastern businessmen, who fly the vehicles in each year to escape the aggressive summer throughout the Gulf. It’s not unusual to see registration plates from the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait – an obvious indication that the cars in question aren’t owned by residents of Central London, but by temporary holidayers.

It’s the latest development in how the Middle East’s richest families spend their vacation time. With temperatures in the region routinely exceeding 40ºC, even the bravest of the brave are uninterested in spending their summer sweating. The smart ones have picked London as their preferred holiday spot, jetting in their vehicles privately and racking up millions of pounds in parking fines.

Yes, that’s right: millions. The cars in question tend to be parked illegally and have been involved in more than their fair share of crashes. Foreign-owned vehicles are responsible for an estimated £4M worth of fines in London alone, leaving many residents more than a little annoyed at the vacationers and their antics. Noise is also a problem, with high-power cars accelerating and disturbing residents.

But for their owners, it’s a mere inconvenience. It could be London this year, Berlin the next. While the city worries about the after effects of its high-profile tourists, some of London’s most exclusive hotel chains are enjoying the surge in high-end customers.

London Home to the World’s Best Taxis, Poll Reveals

A new survey from Hotels.com has revealed that London’s taxis are the most friendly, comfortable, and safe in the world. The survey and complete report asked users to contribute their experiences in taxis around the world, pointing out how safe they felt and how comfortable the ride was. Britain’s capital took the top spot, closely followed by other major European cities such as Madrid.

Surprisingly, it was taxi capital New York City that came in last place for ‘taxi quality’, with users suggesting that despite the city’s large fleet of go-anywhere transportation, the surly and abrasive nature of many taxi drivers made it a poor place to hail a cab. Paris also achieved a low ranking, with its taxi fleet being judged as the rudest of any major global city.

While London cabs are far from cheap, they offered a level of safety that few other cities can match, the survey claims. Travellers ranked the demeanour of London’s drivers positively, while saying that the city’s drivers tend to take direct routes to destinations without wasting time or driving fare prices upwards. Rome received the lowest ‘driver quality’ ranking due to reckless driving habits.

However, one Italian city – Milan – managed to feature in the report’s top rankings. Other surprising additions include Bangkok, which took fifth place, and Sydney, which saw its drivers feature as the least navigationally competent. European cities topped the poll for service quality and ride comfort while simultaneously falling into the poll’s bottom ranks for affordability and value.

The news has been well received by London’s large collection of taxi drivers. The city is frequently thought of as one of the most tourist-friendly in the world, and the confirmation of its taxi quality is another point of pride. For the millions of tourists expected to arrive in London throughout the rest of the year, the results are a comforting, if expensive, reminder that they’ll never be completely lost.